Monday, December 16, 2013

Jackknife Fish

Life of Sea | Jackknife Fish | The Jackknife fish from the Caribbean and is an interesting fish -shaped , with long dorsal and tail fins . The formation of these two fins resemble a Jackknife , hence its common name . These fish are silver in color with black forbidden patterns . Although they are not reef - safe , they are beautiful fish for saltwater fish only aquarium.


It requires a peaceful society in the 70 gallon or larger aquarium with a sandy bottom , and an abundant amount of live rock for a second hideout , and an additional food source . If you combine more than one into the aquarium , be sure to add it at the same time to reduce the likelihood of aggression . It tends to hide during the process of acclimatization to the new aquarium until it feels secure .

Scientific classification

Kingdom : Animalia
Phylum : Chordata
Class : Actinopterygii
Order : Perciformes
Family : Sciaenidae
Genus : Equetus
Species : E. lanceolatus.

Regular meals consisting of a variety of items such as live black worms and brine shrimp and meaty items prepared should bring it out of hiding . Jackknife fish will be combing the sandy bottom looking for worms , crustaceans , and small fish if hungry . It may even eat fireworm occasionally 

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Cow Shark

Life of Sea | Cow Shark | Cow shark, or Hexanchidae, is characterized by the shark family an extra pair or pairs of gill slits. There are currently four known species in three genera, Heptranchias, Hexanchus and Notorynchus. Cow sharks are considered the most primitive of all sharks, because their framework is similar to the shape of an ancient extinct, with few modern adaptations. 
Excretory and digestive systems they are also unspecialised, suggesting that they may be similar to the primitive ancestor of sharks. Their most distinctive feature, however, is the sixth, and, in two genera, seventh, gill slits, in contrast to the five found in all other sharks. 

Scientific classification

Kingdom : Animalia
Phylum : Chordata
Class : Chondrichthyes
Subclass : Elasmobranchii
Order : Hexanchiformes
Family : Hexanchidae J. E. Gray, 1851
They range from 1.4 meters (4.6 feet) to more than 5.5 meters (18 feet) long adult body. Sharks are ovoviviparous cow, the mother retaining the egg-cases in her body until they hatch. They take a relatively large fish of all kinds, including other sharks, as well as on crustaceans and carrion.

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Monday, November 4, 2013

Bala Shark

 

Life of Sea | Bala Shark  | The bala shark, Balantiocheilos melanopterus, also known as the tricolor shark, silver shark, or shark minnow, is a fish species of the family Cyprinidae, and is one of the two species in the genus Balantiocheilos. This species is not a true shark, but is commonly so called because of its torpedo-shaped body and large fins. It is endangered because the population decreased by 50% in the last 10 years.The bala shark occurs in the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, and Borneo. Previous records further north in the Mekong and Chao Phraya River is due to confusion with the recently described and possibly extinct B. ambusticauda (although the presence of any Balantiocheilos in the Mekong is questionable)

Scientific classification
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Actinopterygii
Order:Cypriniformes
Family:Cyprinidae
Genus:Balantiocheilos
Species:B. melanopterus
Binomial name
Bala sharks are misunderstood aquarium fish. These fish are generally peaceful and good companions to many other types of tropical fish. Bala sharks are widely available in most pet stores, but will grow to a size too large for the home aquarium. They are a hardy fish that will tolerate temperature changes, pH changes, and other factors to which other fish may be sensitive. The water pH should be 6.0–8.0. The preferable water hardness for this species is soft to medium (5.0–12.0 dGH). Water temperature should be kept between 22–28°C (72–82°F). The bala shark prefers to be kept in groups of two or more specimens. It requires a covered aquarium as it is a skilled jumper, but may injure itself on the lid of the tank.
Very young bala sharks are sometimes kept in small aquaria. However, given their adult size, schooling behavior, and swimming speed, the fish quickly grow to need much more room. Hobbyists continue to debate over acceptable minimum tank sizes, but generally recommend at least a 2 meter tank. FishBase lists a minimum of 150 cm (5 ft). Many believe the fish is simply too large and too active to be kept in residential aquaria at all; only enormous, custom-built tanks are acceptable, if any tank at all is. Indoor ponds are also considered feasible housing options and may be better suited to the average aquarist.

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Archerfish

Life of Sea| Archerfish  | The archerfish (spinner fish or archer fish) are a family (Toxotidae) of fish known for their habit of preying on land-based insects and other small animals by shooting them down with water droplets from their specialized mouths. The family is small, consisting of seven species in the genus Toxotes; which typically inhabit brackish waters of estuaries and mangroves, but can also be found in the open ocean, as well as far upstream in fresh water. They can be found from India to the Philippines, Australia, and Polynesia. Archerfish or spinnerfish bodies are deep and laterally compressed, with the dorsal fin, and the profile a straight line from dorsal fin to mouth. The mouth is protractile, and the lower jaw juts out. Sizes are generally small,about 5–10 cm, but T. chatareus can reach 40 cm (16 in).
Archerfish are popular for aquaria.
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Actinopterygii
Order:Perciformes
Suborder:Percoidei
Family:Toxotidae
Cuvier, 1816
Genus:Toxotes
Cuvier, 1816
Species

Archerfish are remarkably accurate in their shooting; adult fish almost always hit the target on the first shot. They can bring down insects and other prey on perches, up to 3 m above the water's surface. This is partially due to their good eyesight, but also their ability to compensate for the refraction of light as it passes through the air-water interface when aiming for their prey. They typically spit at prey at a mean angle of about 74° from the horizontal, but can still aim accurately when spitting at angles between 45 and 110°.
When an archerfish selects its prey, it rotates its eye so that the image of the prey falls on a particular portion of the eye in the ventral temporal periphery of the retina, and its lips just break the surface, squirting a jet of water at its victim. It does this using the narrow groove in the roof of its mouth. It presses its tongue against this groove to form a narrow channel, then contracts its gill covers to force a powerful jet of water through the channel. The resulting jet of water can be up to 5 m long, but their accuracy allows them to shoot insects only 1–2 m away depending on body size.  
The fish can alter the power of the shot for prey of different sizes. If the first shot does not knock the victim into the water, the archerfish will keep trying.Young archerfish start shooting when they are about 2.5 cm long, but are inaccurate at first and must learn from experience. During this learning period, they hunt in small schools. This way, the probability is enhanced that at least one jet will hit its target. Archerfish will often leap out of the water and grab an insect in their mouths if it happens to be within reach. Individuals typically prefer to remain close to the surface of the water.
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Thursday, July 11, 2013

Bristlenose Catfish

 Life of Sea | Bristlenose Catfish  | Bristlenose Catfish  or Ancistrus is a genus of freshwater fish in the family Loricariidae of order Siluriformes. Fish of this genus are commonly known as the bushynose or bristlenose plecos. Ancistrus species show all the typical features of the Loricariidae. This includes a body covered in bony plates and a ventral suckermouth. The feature most commonly associated with the genus are the fleshy tentacles found on the head in adult males; females may possess tentacles along the snout margin but they are smaller and they lack tentacles on the head. 
Tentacules, tentacles directly associated with odontodes, develop on the pectoral fin spine of the males of some species. Males also have evertible cheek odontodes which are less developed or absent in females. . Ancistrus species have the capability of obtaining oxygen through their modified stomach. Courtship includes expanding the dorsal and caudal fins and attempts by the male to escort the female to the nest. While the female inspects the nest, the male keeps close contact. 
The female plays no role in parental care; the male takes care of its young. Males will clean the eggs and the cavity with its fins and mouth. Males inspect eggs to remove diseased or infertile eggs, and aerates the clutch by fanning them with its pectoral and pelvic fins.  The eggs hatch in 4–10 days over a period of 2–6 hours; the male guards the eggs for 7–10 days after hatching. 

Scientific classification
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Actinopterygii
Order:Siluriformes
Family:Loricariidae
Subfamily:Hypostominae
Tribe:Ancistrini
Genus:Ancistrus
Kner,1854
If an intruding male manages to evict another male from the nest, it may cannibalize the other male's young. A male bristlenose may guard several clutches of eggs simultaneously. Females prefer males that are already protecting eggs and may prefer males that are protecting larvae; it has been suggested that the tentacles may act as a fry mimic to attract females, which would allow males without eggs in their nest to compete with males guarding eggs. 
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